Tea table from the Tea Salon, 1822-25

 

Whereas coffee and tea tables were widespread in Northern Germany as early as the second half of the eighteenth century, they only became indispensable elements of furniture programmes in Central Europe in the early nineteenth century. As this type of table was generally circular, it was no longer necessary to observe a particular seating hierarchy.

Joseph Danhauser, Tea table from the Tea Salon, 1822-25. © Albertina, Vienna (Photo: elwoods.at)

Joseph Danhauser

Tea table from the Tea Salon, 1822-25

Coffee and tea tables are thus suggestive of the new privacy that had found its way into court life. They were always part of a suite of seating furniture matching in terms of form and material and were assigned a specific place in the room.

 

The present model, made for Archduke Charles around 1822-25 by the Danhauser furniture factory as tea table model no. 41, stood in the palace’s Red Salon until 1919, together with a white and gold group of seats dating from around 1780.