The Venue

 
In addition to the Habsburg Staterooms, the Albertina’s large outdoor terrace can be used for your event. The Albertina palace stands imposingly on the Augustinian bastion, a part of the city’s old walled fortifications. Thus the terrace, one of the most delightful in the city, is elevated high above street level, offering a spectacular view of the Vienna State Opera, the Hofburg palace, the Burggarten park, the Kunsthistorisches Museum and the Austrian National Library.

 

Indoor area

1.300 sq. metres

Banquet capacity

350 persons

Reception capacity

400  persons

 

Outdoor area approx 1.500 sq. metres
Reception capacity 400 persons

 

The Habsburg Staterooms

 

The Albertina’s Habsburg Staterooms are an outstanding example of 19th century Neoclassicism. The palace interior had repeatedly undergone remodelling by the time architect Josef Kornhäusel was contracted in 1822 to redesign the living quarters and the official reception rooms into a unique ensemble. The leading cabinet-makers, stuccoers and painters of the day were employed to decorate the rooms. The luxury materials used included silk, rosewoods, crystal chandeliers and gold. Recently restored to their former glory, the rooms evoke the ornate grandeur of the home of Archduchess Marie Christine, the favourite daughter of Empress Maria Theresa, and her husband, Duke Albert of Saxe-Teschen, the founder of the Albertina’s art collection.

 

  Plan: Habsburgische Prunkräume
 
Gentlemen’s Wing and Ladies’ Wing
 
The staterooms are divided into two suites of rooms: the Gentlemen’s Wing on the Hofburg side of the palace, and the Ladies’ Wing on the Vienna State Opera side. The rooms in the Gentlemen’s Wing are suitable for small-scale receptions and dinners for up to 30 guests. The rooms in the Ladies’ Wing are available for large-scale events. The Spanish Apartments are located in the Ladies’ Wing and can be used for daytime events and small-scale evening events. The combined use of both wings enables guests to experience the full effect of a Neoclassical enfilade, in which doors connecting a sequence of rooms are aligned to provide a through view.